Brain health

Parkinson’s Disease Investigation Show Dramatic Improvements In Patient Care

August 7, 2019

The Neurology Center, a medical group practice of top doctors devoted to excellence in care, located in Houston, Texas, working in conjunction with two leading neurology and anti-aging specialists, has made available the concluding six-month results of their randomized controlled investigation of intravenously administering NuPlasma® young blood plasma into eighteen Parkinson’s disease patients (8 NuPlasma […]

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Predicting Alzheimer’s, up to two years out

August 3, 2019

A new model developed at MIT can help predict if patients at risk for Alzheimer’s disease will experience clinically significant cognitive decline due to the disease, by predicting their cognition test scores up to two years in the future. The model could be used to improve the selection of candidate drugs and participant cohorts for […]

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Scholars weigh in on new ideas about autism

July 31, 2019

A new paper that challenges widely held ideas about autism has attracted comments from more than 30 scholars across the disciplines of psychology, anthropology, education, and neuroscience. The authors maintain that many of the behaviors common to autism — including low eye contact, repetitive movements, and the verbatim repetition of words and phrases — are […]

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Can gut infection trigger Parkinson’s disease?

July 24, 2019

A new study by Montreal scientists published today in Nature demonstrates that a gut infection can lead to a pathology resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD) in a mouse model lacking a gene linked to the human disease. This discovery extends recent work by the same group suggesting that PD has a major immune component, providing new […]

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Alzheimer’s missing link ID’d, answering what tips brain’s decline

July 24, 2019

Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease appear, two kinds of damaging proteins silently collect in the brain: amyloid beta and tau. Clumps of amyloid accumulate first, but tau is particularly noxious. Wherever tangles of the tau protein appear, brain tissue dies, triggering the confusion and memory loss that are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s. Now, researchers at […]

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Broccoli sprout compound may restore brain chemistry imbalance linked to schizophrenia

May 17, 2019

They say the results advance the hope that supplementing with broccoli sprout extract, which contains high levels of the chemical cruciferous vegetables, may someday provide a way to lower the doses of traditional antipsychotic medicines needed to manage schizophrenia symptoms, thus reducing unwanted side effects of the medicines. “It’s possible that future studies could show […]

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Exercise activates memory neural networks in older adults

April 26, 2019

How quickly do we experience the benefits of exercise? A new University of Maryland study of healthy older adults shows that just one session of exercise increased activation in the brain circuits associated with memory — including the hippocampus — which shrinks with age and is the brain region attacked first in Alzheimer’s disease. “While […]

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Important insight on the brain-body connection

April 22, 2019

A study conducted by University of Arkansas researchers reveals that neurons in the motor cortex of the brain exhibit an unexpected division of labor, a finding that could help scientists understand how the brain controls the body and provide insight on certain neurological disorders. The researchers studied the neurons in the motor cortex of rats […]

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Early exposure to pesticides linked to small increased risk of autism spectrum disorder

April 7, 2019

Exposure to common agricultural pesticides before birth and in the first year of life is associated with a small to moderately increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with infants of women without such exposure, finds a study published in The BMJ today. The researchers say their findings support efforts to prevent exposure to […]

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Eyes reveal early Alzheimer’s disease

April 7, 2019

Reduced blood capillaries in the back of the eye may be a new, noninvasive way to diagnose early cognitive impairment, the precursor to Alzheimer’s disease in which individuals become forgetful, reports a newly published Northwestern Medicine study. Scientists detected these vascular changes in the human eye non-invasively, with an infrared camera and without the need […]

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