Author: Dick Benson

Diet, Nutrition Have Profound Effects on Gut Microbiome

March 26, 2020

Nutrition and diet have a profound impact on microbial composition in the gut, in turn affecting a range of metabolic, hormonal, and neurological processes, according to a literature review by scientists from the George Washington University (GW) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The article is published in Nutrition Reviews. Until recently, […]

Read More

Alzheimer’s disease: Inflammation triggers fatal cycle

March 26, 2020

An immune reaction in the brain seems to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. In a way, it “adds fuel to the fire” and apparently causes an inflammation that, in a sense, keeps kindling itself. The study has now been published in the journal Cell Reports. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by […]

Read More

Too much salt weakens the immune system

March 26, 2020

A high-salt diet is not only bad for one’s blood pressure, but also for the immune system. This is the conclusion of a current study under the leadership of the University Hospital Bonn. Mice fed a high-salt diet were found to suffer from much more severe bacterial infections. Human volunteers who consumed an additional six […]

Read More

Singapore modelling study estimates impact of physical distancing on reducing spread of COVID-19

March 26, 2020

A new modelling study conducted in a simulated Singapore setting has estimated that a combined approach of physical distancing interventions, comprising quarantine (for infected individuals and their families), school closure, and workplace distancing, is most effective at reducing the number of SARS-CoV-2 cases compared with other intervention scenarios included in the study. While less effective […]

Read More

A good blood supply is good for memory

March 6, 2020

Memory performance and other cognitive abilities benefit from a good blood supply to the brain. This applies in particular to people affected by a condition known as “sporadic cerebral small vessel disease.” Researchers of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University Medicine Magdeburg report on this in the journal “BRAIN.” Their study […]

Read More

CT provides best diagnosis for COVID-19

March 6, 2020

In a study of more than 1,000 patients published in the journal Radiology, chest CT outperformed lab testing in the diagnosis of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The researchers concluded that CT should be used as the primary screening tool for COVID-19. In the absence of specific therapeutic drugs or vaccines for COVID-19, it is […]

Read More

Could new discovery play a role in diagnosing Alzheimer’s earlier?

March 5, 2020

Scientists have detected that a previously overlooked gene behavior could potentially lead to a new way to diagnose Alzheimer’s earlier. Published in the journal Epigenetics, an international research team’s findings – discovered in mice and confirmed in human samples – suggest that the gene Presenilin1 (PSEN1) should be monitored as a ‘biomarker’: to see what […]

Read More

The secret to a long life?

March 4, 2020

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that worms live longer lives if they produce excess levels of a protein, p62 or SQSTM1, which recognizes toxic cell proteins that are tagged for destruction. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, could help uncover treatments for age-related conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which are often […]

Read More

A deep dive into cellular aging

February 20, 2020

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Harvard University have discovered that mitochondria trigger senescence, the sleep-like state of aged cells, through communication with the cell’s nucleus—and identified an FDA-approved drug that helped suppress the damaging effects of the condition in cells and mice. The discovery, published in Genes & Development, could lead […]

Read More

Empathy can be detected in people whose brains are at rest

February 20, 2020

UCLA researchers have found that it is possible to assess a person’s ability to feel empathy by studying their brain activity while they are resting rather than while they are engaged in specific tasks. Traditionally, empathy is assessed through the use of questionnaires and psychological assessments. The findings of this study offer an alternative to […]

Read More